Search

My Headspace #7 New Information, Welcome?

Thank you to Dave Fish, former Harvard Men’s Tennis Head Coach and Hall of Fame for a recent book recommendation. How We Learn To Move, by Rob Gray, PHD, a professor at Arizona State University, which has one of the better Physical Education departments in the US, it has been a revelation, and while it’s affirming some teachings I have been using that are outside the conventional wisdom of teaching sports movements, it’s also challenging me even further. This is both good and bad. The good is that I am gaining much more and better context for teaching, and this freshness keeps what I am doing on the cutting edge. Staying on the very front edge of what is known about teaching and learning is part of my mission. Wired Magazine has a feature that I love a lot called “Wired, Tired, Fired”. In that feature, they show how people are are wired know what’s coming, and are early adopters. People who are tired are 6 months to 2 years behind the early adopters, and are putting things into play shortly ahead of the time that they will become obsolete. People who get fired are hopelessly behind. So, whether it’s the use of technology, learning new and better ways to facilitate people’s ability to learn, or writing a book in a little explored area, or taking it to a whole new level, I try to stay wired. But that can take a lot of energy.

The bad part of this new information is that it takes more brain power to go through a paradigm shift. Already without expending much brain power, that lump in your head uses about 20% of your calories even thought it’s only 3% of your mass. Once you go through a paradigm shift and get the resulting cognitive dissonance, then that energy consumption goes way up. In addition, the amount of energy used in helping people transition away from poor methods in learning to those that are little explored creates the same effect for them with maybe a multiplier attached. I will be blogging a bit on this book, and what I’m learning, interspersed with the strategy posts that precede the publication of Tennis Strategy 201 coming up soon.


***


Visual Training For Tennis 4th Edition

(this week, got to #1 in Physical Education a few times on Amazon)


Bill Patton's Books


Blazepods are a Great Visual Training, Decision Making Tool


SwingVision - A Game Changer!


Do You Want To Know When A New Post Is Available?


SpecTennis - A Tennis Like Alternative Played On Tennis or Pickleball Courts


Bill Patton's Coach Tube Courses

Jack Broudy System Of Technique


Generosity

Take the 30-day generosity challenge! For 30 days, tip everyone who gives you service, at the coffee shop, rideshare driver, hair cut, etc. You will be surprised at the good things coming your way!


you can Venmo a couple of bucks to @billpatton720

I look forward to your comments, if you comment I will respond, but not looking to have a huge conversation!


Thank you for watching, it’s like a convention every day with no travel expenses or registration fees.


If you would like to book me as a Keynote, MC, or to give a presentation on:

* The Art of Coaching High School Tennis

* Visual Training for Tennis

* How to get Your Players to the Net

* Top 5 Strategies and Tactics for Winning Tennis


Tennis, coaching, strokes, backhand, shot combinations, strategy, Uspta, ptr, etc, tennis Haus, tennis congress, essential tennis, Bill Patton, the art of coaching high school tennis, tennis evolution, the art of winning, transform the practice court, USTA player development, Roger Federer, Rafa Nadal, Serena Williams Essential tennis, fuzzy yellow balls, Brent Abel, webtennis.com, Jeff Salzenstein, evolution tennis, USTA, Uspta, ptr, Roger Federer, strategy and tactics, athlete-centered coach, Bill Patton, tennis lessons, how to, Styrling Strother, brain game tennis, the art of winning, dan Travis, Wimbledon 2021, dominant eye tennis, Robert Lansdorp, Vic Braden

Recent Posts

See All

I’m writing today from the Sierra Nevada Mountains, although some may call it the foothills, even though we are are 4,500 feet. It feels mountainy enough for me. And yes, this post may have some new

Better to be a jack of all trades, than the master of only one! ~ Unknown Disruptive Player Rules of Thumb Part of the reason you have chosen to become a disruptive player is that you don’t have the